Locatie: What is our education like - The School Guide - English

What is our Education Like?

 

3.1 Grouping, group size, and organisation of lessons

The groups at both locations consist of around 30 pupils. Each group has a maximum of 32 children. Occasionally, the number of children can be more than 32 children.

At both locations, we work with heterogeneous and homogeneous age groups, depending on the number of students in the different age groups. The lessons are provided by the class teacher (or the specialist teachers) and usually consist of instruction and assignments to be made individually or in small groups. Cooperative methods and structures are often put into use.

In the lower grades, we start with encouraging the autonomy of children whenever possible. We work with a planning board in groups 1 to 3.

The children thus learn to plan their work and this allows the teacher to give more individual attention to children who need it.

On De Eglantier we use cooperative learning to enhance the quality of education. Some skills can be linked to cooperative learning. Pupils can learn from each other, not only knowledge but also skills. Pupils learn a lot from example, demonstration, working together and imitation (modelling). Pupils put their thoughts into words, learn to argue, adjust their "truth" to new insights and connections.

There is a distinction between unconsciously and consciously learning together in a cooperative manner. Children are keen to work cooperatively. When a teacher gives a cooperation assignment, pupils often choose a friend to work on the task in pairs.

Collaborative learning is a conscious tool for the teacher to teach collaborative skills. A teacher approaches collaborative learning in a structured way, giving it more depth and quality. Collaborative learning can work in pairs, but also in groups of four.

 

Cooperative learning has four basic features:

Equal participation

Each student has a personal contribution. The participation of each student is arranged so that there is equality.

Individual responsibility

The pupils know that they are individually responsible. Each student in the group must be able to tell how the process was and what his contribution has been to the end result.

Positive interdependence

Pupils should be able to depend on each other in the cooperation assignment.

They know that they need each other in order to perform an activity successfully.

The pupils have a group goal and that goal can only be achieved when each member contributes.

Simultaneous action

When all pupils are actively involved in the assignments, they will exchange knowledge, ideas and information. Moreover, they will discover that when they work together they know more than alone. It is important that all pupils get their turn.

 

3.2 Activities in grades 1 and 2

The kindergarten groups work thematically by using the Early Years program. We work with a planning board. The planning board allows the children to choose in which particular area (or corners) they want to work that day. By providing challenging material and a wide range of activities in the zone of proximal development of the child, the child is encouraged to develop in small steps. The teacher creates a stimulating learning environment by focusing on the corners of the classroom with spelling, learning and developmental materials. During circle times a multitude of topics are presented. Each week a letter or sound gets special attention, allowing the pupils to learn all the letters in a playful manner. Phonics and early mathematics methods are used which return during gaming / learning opportunities in different forms. The development of the child is stimulated into growth.

In addition there is plenty of room for playing together, exercise, rhythm and expression. The children will see that learning is fun and it will increases their self-confidence through successful experiences in social interaction and achieving results.

 

3.3 Basic skills (reading, language, math)

In groups 1 and 2, we start in a playful manner with language and mathematics. From group 3 upwards, children develop further on the basis of existing learning methods. Of course children differ in the rate at which they develop. This could be because of their background, aptitude and motivation. Both the teachers and the methods we use adapt to those differences. Our teaching is interactive. That is, the teacher creates situations, by means of cooperative learning in which the children in response to each other engage in language. In addition, we believe it is important that the children can handle properly spoken and written Dutch at their own level. Teaching spelling and practicing grammar therefore form an important part of language learning at our school.

 

Subject

Methods  Tanthof

Methods Voorhof

Language

Schatkist (gr 1 en 2)

Beginnende geletterdheid (gr 1 en 2)

Early years (gr 1 en 2)

Veilig leren lezen (gr 3)

Staal (gr 4 t/m 8)

Beginnende geletterdheid (gr 1 en 2)

Early years (gr 1 en 2)

Veilig leren lezen (gr 3)

Taal in beeld (gr 4 t/m 8)

Reading

Veilig leren lezen (gr 3)

Nieuwsbegrip (gr 4 t/m 8)

Lekker lezen (gr 4 t/m 6)

Veilig leren lezen (gr 3)

Nieuwsbegrip (gr 4 t/m 8)

Estafette (gr 4 t/m 8)

Mathematics

Schatkist (gr 1 en 2)

Gecijferd bewustzijn (gr 1 en 2)

Wereld In Getallen (gr 4 t/m 8)

Bronnenboek Rekenrijk (gr 1 en 2)

Gecijferd bewustzijn (gr 1 en 2)

Rekenrijk (gr 4 t/m 8)

Handwriting

Schrijfdans (gr 2)

Pennenstreken (gr 2 t/m 8)

Schrijfdans (gr 2)

Pennenstreken (gr 2 t/m 6)

English

I-pockets (gr 1 t/m 4)

Happy serie (gr 4 t/m 8)

I-pockets (gr 1 t/m 4)

Happy serie (gr 4 t/m 8)

IPC

Early Years (gr 1 en 2)

IPC (gr 3 t/m 8)

Schooltuinen (gr 2, 6 en 8)

EHBO (gr 8)

Early Years (gr 1 en 2)

IPC (gr 3 t/m 8)

Schooltuinen (gr 2, 4, 6 en 8)

EHBO (gr 8)

Topography

Land in zicht

Geobas

Traffic

Verkeerslessen plein en buurt (gr 1 t/m 8)

Rondje verkeer (gr 1 t/m 3)

Op voeten en fietsen (3VO) (gr 4 en 5)

Jeugdverkeerskrant (3VO) (gr 6 t/m 8)

Verkeerslessen plein en buurt (gr 1 t/m 8)

Rondje verkeer (gr 1 t/m 3)

Op voeten en fietsen (3VO) (gr 4 en 5)

Jeugdverkeerskrant (3VO) (gr 6 t/m 8)

Social and emotional development

IPC/Early Years (gr 1 t/m 8)

IPC/Early Years (gr 1 t/m 8)

Physical education in addition

to IPC

Planning n.a.v. Kleuters in het speellokaal (gr 1 en 2)

Planning n.a.v. de visie van de HALO (Haagse Academie voor Lichamelijke

Opvoeding) (gr 3 t/m 8)

Planning n.a.v. Kleuters in het speellokaal (gr 1 en 2)

Planning n.a.v. de visie van de HALO (Haagse Academie voor Lichamelijke

Opvoeding) (gr 3 t/m 8)

Dance

Verschillende dansmethodes worden

gebruikt als bronnenmateriaal (gr 1 t/m 8)

Verschillende dansmethodes worden gebruikt als bronnenmateriaal (gr 1 t/m 8)

 

3.4 The International Primary Curriculum (IPC)

The language courses (Dutch and English), reading and math are the so-called basic skills that fills a large part of the curriculum and which are outside the IPC. In these subjects the children are offered the same curriculum as the 'regular' Dutch schools, guaranteeing the standards of Dutch education. On the basis of our pupil monitoring system (testing) we follow the progress of pupils in these fields and we regularly evaluate our education, the methods, and the tools we use. All the other subjects, and subject areas are a part of the IPC. The course material consists of so-called Units. For each grade (milepost) special units have been designed to suit the development and experiences of the child in that period.

A unit consists of a central theme, and has a number of objectives. This learning activity are drawn up based on those objectives.

Each theme will address different subject areas, so that the children learn to look at a subject in different ways. The activities are designed in such a way that the different talents and skills of children are called upon. By offering thematic teaching there is much room for children to contribute to the content and design of learning. We include questions the children ask and encourage them to look for and formulate the answers themselves. Cooperative methods are often used in this stage. The choice of units is partly determined by the demands placed on our education.

The Netherlands Studies are added to the curriculum in the units, to meet the core objectives as laid down in the Law on Primary Education in The Netherlands.

The learning objectives of IPC have been formulated for four age levels. These are called mileposts. At every milepost learning objectives have been described, which children must attain by the end of the school year in which they are respectively 5, 7, 9 or 12 years old.

In the mileposts, distinctions are made between:

  • Course related targets; learning objectives for all the different subjects;
  • Personal goals; learning objectives for the development of personal qualities, such as: adaptability, curiosity, independence and social skills;
  • International goals; learning objectives for the development of an international perspective.

Within the IPC the following integrated subjects are offered:

  • Physics and biology;
  • Arts, Crafts;
  • Technology (including ICT);
  • Geography;
  • History;
  • Social relationships;
  • Internationalisation.

The IPC has a website, on which you can find information about the philosophy, structure and content,

www.ipc-nederland.nl.

De Eglantier pays special attention to active citizenship, to give children a good place in our society in the future. Of course we will take into account how the children experience the world.

Three domains are central in civic education:

Democracy: knowledge about the democratic state and political decision making;

Participation: knowledge necessary to participate actively in society;

Identity: exploring one’s own identity and that of others.

Active citizenship is a common theme that runs through all the grades and does not stop after leaving our school. We encourage the children to form their own opinion and to express this and to have respect for others.

 

3.5 School Gardens

Working outside plays an important role in nature education activities. Next to the building of the IB location Voorhof there is a school garden, which is used by groups 2 and 4. The pupils of group 8 of the location Voorhof help the oldest kindergartners with gardening.

School gardens have been realised at the location Tanthof. The two group 6 of the two locations garden at the gardens of the Foundation Delft Children’s Gardens.

 

3.6 Music, expression and physical education

Music, expression, and physical education (PE) are important subjects at our school. In groups 1 and 2, the children have daily PE lessons to accommodate the child’s natural need for movement. This takes place in in the gym room which is furnished with a variety of materials, such as climbing frames, benches, mats, hoops, balls etc.

In addition to these PE lessons, we also provide game lessons for developing social and emotional skills. Furthermore, dance is an integral part of the program. Weather permitting, the children play daily on the playground with bicycles, carts, scooters, or they can go climbing on the playground equipment. Groups 3 to 8 receive PE lessons from a specialist teacher, twice a week. On occasion, we hire third parties for specialist lessons, like dance or drama lessons.The classes are offered during PE lessons.

De Eglantier has joined the pilot project Swim2Play in Delft. This is a project started by the local swimming pools and the Librijn to provide ‘wet’ PE lessons for groups of pupils during parts of the school year. Our school will take part in this pilot project with grades 5 to 8 during the school year 2014-2015.

3.7 Computer education

All groups have two or more computers with accessories in the classroom. Both locations may use laptops and a laptop cart.

The pupils all have the opportunity to work on the computer with programs for math and language. In addition, the children will learn how to use the Internet and the programs Word, Excel and PowerPoint. Sometimes the computer is used as a remedial tool for children who need extra practice.

In virtually all groups in both locations the blackboards have been replaced by projectors and interactive whiteboards. This provides a means to give instruction in an interactive manner, watch educational films and use the Internet. Children have safe access to the Internet in a protected learning environment.

Teachers supervise while the children are computing. No filter is used. All monitors are directed to the classroom.

3.8 English

English language education is very important at our school, therefore there are native speakers and certified English teachers attached to the school. The children in the lower grades learn the basics of a (mostly) second language in a playful manner. In the middle and upper grades, these basic principles are further expanded.

Research indicates that children are at a great advantage when they start learning English at an early stage. They will be able to build on the basic knowledge when continuing with the English lessons, and can draw on the experience when learning other languages. We continue to strive for excellence in the education we provide and therefor we have joined Earlybird to improve our English education. For more information, see www.earlybirdie.nl. In June 2014 we were the first school in Delft to receive the Early Bird certificate.

 

3.9 Homework

In group 3, the parents will be informed via email about what the students learn in the next unit of reading and language. We do this because the development in that area in group 3 progresses in a fast pace and this enables parents to practice with their child.

In the lower grades no homework is given. However, parents may be asked to read with their child at home or to do additional exercises, if necessary. From group 5 homework becomes a regular feature.

The homework consists of:   

  • Preparation for tests and dictations;
  • Mathematical word problems, vocabulary exercises, grammar, information processing, etc.;
  • Projects;
  • Assignments based on an IPC theme;
  • Preparing a book review;
  • Revision of work or practicing skills that have been addressed in the classroom;
  • English.

The teacher notifies the children of an upcoming test at least one week in advance. Pupils in the higher grades have a calendar to record the tests and homework.

The amount of homework is slowly cranked up as the child approaches secondary education. Nevertheless, we think it is important that a child can relax after school. When a child's daily homework load takes up too much time, it is wise to contact the class teacher.