Locatie: Education - School prospectus - English

Education

Chapter 3:  Education 

3.1 Groups, Group sizes and Organisation
At the Tanthof location there are between 20 and 28 students in each class. At the Voorhof location classes range from 26 to 32 students. We intend in admitting no more than 30 students per class. However, occasionally it is possible that the number of students in a group exceeds 30.

We work with both homogeneous and heterogeneous age groups. Lessons are given by the teacher and consist of instructions and assignments that have to be done individually or in small groups. For the instructions and the delivery of  assignments we mostly use cooperative learning strategies.

We use cooperative learning strategies to enhance the quality of our education. The strategies have various aims such as: building team spirit and positive relationships among students; information sharing; critical thinking; communication skills; and mastering (learning/remembering) specific material. Cooperative learning can also  fulfil a number of goals simultaneously   and be adapted to a particular student group, depending on the activity. 

Cooperative learning has four basic characteristics:

·         Equal Participation - All students receive the same opportunities and incentives to participate in cooperative learning. Kagan's approach uses carefully designed tasks, rewards and accountability procedures to encourage positive and just participation. For example, during a specific task, all students receive a role of equal importance and if the roles are not of equal status (e.g. such as leader and checker roles), then they are  randomly assigned and rotated over the course of the term. 

·         Positive Interdependence - There is a "win-win" situation where the success of one student is positively linked to the success of others in the class. In other words, students need each other to succeed, and a gain from one child is a gain for another. In this kind of relationship, student care for their peers and are engaged in helping them in their learning. 

·         Individual Accountability - There is a process in place to hold students accountable for their contribution and individual participation in group-work. This is also a way to evaluate the quality of participation, effort and result for of each group member. 

·         Simultaneous Interaction - All students are actively engaged at the same time during the class. An example would be to have 20 pairs of students in a class of 40 children all talking/listening simultaneously, as opposed to one student answering a teacher's question, while all the others are quiet.

3.2 Activities in Groups 1 -4
In the nursery groups 1 and 2 we work according to the IPC Early Years program. We encourage children to work independently from an early age. To facilitate this, we use an agenda on the board so children can plan their work, allowing the teacher to assist individual children.
During “circle time”, the students sit in a circle and the teacher discusses a variety of subjects including language learning and mathematics.
There is also plenty of room for playtime, gym, and free expression. Children find out that learning is fun. Their self-confidence is enhanced by their successes in social interaction and other activities.
In groups 3 and 4 we start working with a curriculum.

3.3 Method Overview
We strive to use the same educational methods at both locations. Decisions regarding the purchase and implementation of new methods will be made jointly. Due to differences in the budget it is possible that new methods will not be purchased by both locations in the same year.
An overview of the methods we use is given below: 

 

Subject

 

 

 

Methods Voorhof

 

 

 

Methods Tanthof

 

 

 

Literacy

 

 

 

Piramide

 

 

Beginnende geletterdheid

 

 

Veilig leren lezen

 

 

Zin in taal

 

Schatkist

 

 

Beginnende geletterdheid

 

 

Veilig leren lezen

 

 

Taalverhalen

 

Reading

 

 

 

Veilig leren lezen

 

 

Ondersteboven van lezen

 

 

Estafette

 

Veilig leren lezen

 

 

Nieuwsbegrip

 

 

Lekker lezen

 

Numeracy

 

 

 

Ideeënboek Wereld in getallen

 

 

Wereld in getallen

 

Schatkist

 

 

Voorbereidend rekenrijk

 

Writing

 

 

 

Pennenstreken

 

 

 

Pennenstreken

 

 

 

English

 

 

 

Happy Series and I pockets

 

 

 

Happy Series and I pockets

 

 

 

IPC

 

 

 

IPC/Early Years

 

 

Schooltuinen

 

 

EHBO

 

 

Piramide

 

 

 

IPC/Early Years

 

 

Schooltuinen

 

 

EHBO

 

 

Schatkist

 

Topography

 

 

 

Geobas

 

 

 

Land in zicht

 

 

 

Traffic lessons

 

 

 

Piramide project verkeer

 

 

Rondje verkeer

 

 

Op voeten en fietsen (3VO)

 

 

Jeugdverkeerskrant (3VO)

 

Piramide project verkeer

 

 

Rondje verkeer

 

 

Op voeten en fietsen (3VO)

 

 

Jeugdverkeerskrant (3VO)

 

Social-Emotional Development

 

IPC/Early Years

 

 

 

IPC/Early Years

 

 

Goed gedaan

 

Physical Education

 

 

 

Planning n.a.v. de visie van de HALO (Haagse Academie voor Lichamelijke

 

 

Opvoeding)

 

Planning n.a.v. de visie van de HALO (Haagse Academie voor Lichamelijke

 

 

Opvoeding)

 

Dancing

 

 

 

Verschillende dansmethodes worden

 

 

gebruikt als bronnenmateriaal

 

Verschillende dansmethodes worden

 

 

gebruikt als bronnenmateriaal

 

 

3.4 Basic Skills 
In groups 1 and 2, they start learning some literacy and numeracy skills. From group 3 and onwards, we use educational methods to futher develop their skills.
In the literacy lessons, we use the “Veilig leren lezen” method in group 3 and in the other groups we use the “ Zin in taal” method. These methods cover the requirements for reading and writing in the national curriculum for Dutch and contribute substantially to the development of speaking and listening. Our language lessons are also interactive which means that teachers are using cooperative learning strategies.
For numeracy, we use the “Wereld in getallen” method. Our aim is to promote confidence and competence in using mathematics to solve everyday problems.  

3.5 The International Primary Curriculum (IPC)
Since we have an international characteristic at our school already, we want to add an international dimension to our education. That is why we have chosen to implement the International Primary Curriculum.
Another important reason to choose the IPC is that this curriculum has incorporated the latest insights on how children learn.
The International Primary Curriculum is a thematic, learning-focused curriculum, with specific learning targets in the core subject areas of Science, Information Technology, Design Technology, History, Geography, Music, Art and Society. The delivery of the IPC is based on up-to-date neurological research about the brain and how we learn. Consequently the school aims to provide a “brain-friendly” environment in which the learning process is optimized for all children. Another unique element of the IPC is the concept of “international-mindedness” which underpins the entire curriculum; this global perspective promotes international awareness and understanding as a fundamental characteristic of every Eglantier student.

3.6 Gardening
Outdoor activities are an important part of our nature lessons. At the main building location at Voorhof, the younger children (groups 2 and 4) have their own garden. The children learn how to take care of a garden. The group 8 children help the younger children with gardening. The group 6 children of both locations do their gardening at the “Delftse kindertuinen”.

 3.7 Music, Drama and Physical Education
De Eglantier places an important emphasis on the development of music, expression, dance and physical education (PE). Groups 1 and 2 have PE lessons daily. The lessons are given in the play area in the central hall of each location. During these lessons, the children are exposed to equipment such as, a jungle gym, benches, mats, hoops and balls. Besides PE , the children receive lessons around play, which are meant to develop social and emotional skills. Furthermore, dance is also part of our curriculum program. During these lessons, the children need to wear gym shoes. These shoes can be kept at school.

Groups 3 to 8 receive physical education lessons from PE teacher. Group 4 has PE and swimming lessons every other week. Group 2 and groups 5 to 8 have PE twice a week.  Dancing lessons are offered in lesson units during the year.

Every day, weather permitting, the children play outside in the playground with bicycles, carts, scooters, and skipping ropes. They can also use the swings or jungle gym.

3.8 ICT
Both locations are very well resourced with interactive whiteboards (smartboards) in almost all of the classes. These smartboards are used for interactive instruction and internet use and viewing of short clips from school TV.
Each classroom has two or more computers for the students to use. In the central hallway of the Voorhof location there is also a computer room for group teaching.
Each student has the opportunity to work with special software for literacy and numeracy. Children are also taught how to use the Internet and software programs such as Word, Excel and PowerPoint. The computer is also used as a means for remedial teaching.
Children have safe access to the Internet within a protected environment. Teachers supervise computer use. No filters are used. Monitors are placed facing the teacher.

3.9 English as an Additional Language
At De Eglantier a lot of attention is given to learning English as an additional language. That is why we have employed two native speakers. In the early years (groups 1-4) the children are taught the basics in a playful way. In groups 5-8 these basics are deepened and extended.

We expect children will have great benefits from learning English at an early age. They will be able to draw from experience when learning other languages or when they take further lessons in English.

3.10 Homework
In groups 1-4, no homework is given apart from the occasional assignment. If necessary, teachers can ask parents to do some extra reading or other exercises at home. From group 5 onwards homework is given on a more regular basis.
T
he homework consists of: 

·         preparing for tests and dictations 

·         making sums, vocabulary exercises, grammar , etc. 

·         writing assignments  

·         preparing a book report 

·         assignments from an IPC unit 

·         revision exercises or practicing skills 

The teacher gives a weeks’ notice before a test. Children have an agenda to plan and write down important dates for tests and other homework.

The amount of homework increases as the child progresses towards secondary school, however, we also find it think it important that a child has the chance to relax after school hours. If a child takes too long to finish the homework, please contact the teacher.